Posted in Reblog, writing advice

Want More Writing Success? Learn to Be a QUITTER

I read this blog post and I just had to share. It’s something I really needed to hear right now, and I thought maybe others might need to as well. Who knew being a quitter could be a good thing. 🙂

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Ah, the New Year is upon us. Most of our resolutions revolve around grabbing hold with a death-grip and vowing to never let go. When it comes to losing weight, getting out of debt, or discovering if our closets actually have floors? This is a good plan. Yet, when it comes to our careers? Never giving up might keep us from ever succeeding.

Want to know the secret to success? Quitting. Yes, you heard me correctly. And, if you’re a creative professional, it is in your interest to learn to get really good at quitting. Maybe you’ve felt like a loser or a failure, that your dream to make a living with your art was a fool’s errand.

Ignore that junk and understand…

Winners Quit All the Time

I posit this thought; if we ever hope to achieve anything remarkable, we must learn to quit. In fact, I’ll take…

View original post 1,280 more words

Posted in Reblog

Should Authors Write Bad Book Reviews?

This is a fabulous post that I stumbled upon today. It’s something I’ve struggled with myself. As I am not a heavy book reviewer, I wondered if writing a bad book review would be acceptable. There have been a few books I’ve read that caused me to consider a least giving the author a heads up on some issues within a book. This certainly put the subject in perspective for me and I couldn’t help but share.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Okay, yesterday we had a little bit of a debate about leaving book reviews. First of all, the post is to warn you of the dangers of posting bad reviews as an author. Does it mean you can’t? No. Can you tweet while drinking and listening to LinkinPark? Yes, but you do so at your own risk. Same here. I am not the social media gestapo, but I am here to warn you of the hazards that are REAL.

We Never Know Who People Know

I once commented offhandedly to an acquaintance about a book I was reading. I wasn’t nasty, I just mentioned that I found it confusing and the dream sequences were messing me up. I also added that it could be me. I WAS seven-months pregnant, so I added the caveat that it could just be Baby Brain.

Little did I know the acquaintance was BEST…

View original post 1,179 more words

Posted in Reblog

Character/Scene Tracking With Scrivener Tags

This is a great article on character arc and how to track characters using the novel management software Scrivener (which I use and love, love, love).

John Castle

One of the fundamental applications of tagging in Scrivener is one that I haven’t touched on yet, but it’s extremely powerful.

Most writers know the power and utility of character arcs. Readers want to see not so much what happens to our protagonist and stakes characters but what they do about it — but the real meat of the story, what really delivers on the premise and what readers will either love or hate about your story when all is said and done, is how these characters are changed by what has happened to them and what they’ve done about it.

Example: Steve Rogers isn’t Captain America at the beginning of Captain America: The First Avenger. He isn’t even Captain America after Dr. Erskine whammies him with the super-soldier serum. Even after he’s met his original goal of being deployed and is hawking war bonds on stage in his costume…

View original post 404 more words