Posted in editing, writing, writing advice

My Basic Editing Service Packages

I have been doing editing for awhile, but realized I don’t have one convenient place that talks about what I offer. So here’s a run down of the major packages I have right now. If you don’t see something that fits your needs or close to your word count, please feel free to contact me and we can negotiate a price for your work.

I take pride in being able to give writers a spot on assessment of their work as well as ideas for character enhancement, plot development, story structure, and word choice, and of course, the usual punctuation, spelling, and grammar check. Once my edit is complete, you’ll have a comprehensive idea of what needs more work, and what is working well for your piece. I can even give guidance or suggestions (if wanted) to the next steps to take in your publishing journey.

Here is a list down of the editing packages I currently offer…

Flash Fiction: This is for those short and sweet stories that are over in a flash. Will edit any genre up to 1,500 words. Turn around time is about 2 or 3 days. Price is $5.

Chapter By Chapter: This is editing on a budget, or just wanting to work through one chapter at a time. This package is also good for short stories too. Will edit any genre (chapter or short story) up to 8,000 words. Turn around time is about 3 to 5 days. Price is $15.

Novella: This is for a novella piece. Will edit any genre up to 60,000 words. Turn around time is about 1 to 2 weeks. Price is $199.

Novel: This is for a novel length work. Will edit any genre up to 120,000 words. Turn around time is about 3 to 5 weeks, depending on how heavy the editing is. Price is $399.

If what you need edited falls between any of these packages, contact me for a more accurate pricing. I can also do multiple editing passes for one piece to make it as clean as possible at an adjusted rate.

Not sure if my services are for you? Try out my free story, novella, novel consultation offer (you can read more about the offer here). I will read your piece and give an honest over all opinion of how it’s working or not working, and some basic ideas of what to do to make it a better read.

If you would like to see an edited sample of my work, I would be happy to provide one or two upon request. Simply contact me for that inquiry. I have worked with several authors over the years to help them edit and publish their works. I look forward to doing the same for you.

I’m excited to work with you to make your writing the best it can be. I love making stories beautiful, and I appreciate the opportunity to be involved with your work of art. But my editing services don’t stop there! I love being a cheerleader and supporter of writers, so expect my moral support as you publish and beyond.

Are you in need of a book cover? I do that as well. Check out my print and ebook cover packages here.

Posted in novel, novella, short story, story consultation, writing, writing advice

Free Short Story, Novella, Novel Consultation Offer

Image from Pixabay

I love stories. I love writing stories. I love reading stories. Why? Because there’s nothing quite like that feeling of rightness and satisfaction after finishing a great story.

It’s an even better feeling knowing when I write such a story. Yeah, that’s pretty awesome.

But for me, there’s an even better feeling of accomplishment. And that’s helping other writers feel pride in a story well written, and even helping them get it published.

That’s one of my goals for the new year, to help lift up other writers so they too can feel pride in a job well done. So they (you) can realize the dream of becoming a published author, or just feel freaking amazing for writing and completing that story that’s been a haunting obsession.

I know from experience that writing is not always a clear cut path. Doubt and indecision can be a constant plague. Sometimes even making us question our work, and if we should continue to write. The odds may not seem in our favor, so why even bother?

I want to help alleviate some of that doubt by offering my time and experience. I want to help those seeking guidance in their story, novella, or novel. So on a first come, first serve basis, I am offering free story consultation. It doesn’t matter the length or genre, I want to read your work, and then let you know what I think.

I will give you an honest opinion of how it reads, feels, and my reactions for the over all story. I can also give you an idea of what sort, if any, editing the story will need to complete it. I can also give guidance on steps to take to self-publish, if that’s your goal. Or give tips on how to prep your work for submission to a traditional publisher.

This is just an overview, a start to get you pointed in the right direction, a pat on the back for the parts of writing that are working for you, and a stop sign for the parts that need a little extra help.

Continue reading “Free Short Story, Novella, Novel Consultation Offer”
Posted in A Writer's Life, better writing, inspiration, The Writer's Toolbox, write, writer, writing, writing advice, writing better

Everything Else Comes First, Before I Write

Yes, I know. That title contradicts every single piece of writing advice I have ever been given, or heard. In fact, it’s probably the number one advice most give about writing––to put writing first, and do it every day. And perhaps for many that’s what they need––to put writing first, and do it every single day. But I’ve been doing just that for years, and it’s been having a very negative effect on all the other parts of my life.

I need balance. And when I put writing first, I can’t achieve balance, no matter how hard I try (and believe me, I have tried).

So I’m trying something new. I have reprioritized my life and made a new list of how things with happen and it goes something like this…

Continue reading “Everything Else Comes First, Before I Write”

Posted in character, characterization, how to write, Michael Knost, online class, The Writer's Toolbox, unforgettable characters, writing, writing advice, writing better

Using Body Language to Tell Your Story

I recently took an online class through my friend and fellow writer Michael Knost on body language, and wanted to share some of the highlights that I found helpful. This was a topic I knew some about from other writing sources, but his class really brought everything into prospective for me.

Body language is essential in creating believable characters. It’s the subtle things like a smile in just the right place of a conversation, or a small touch of the hand that can change the whole way a reader perceives a character. When you show a character through their body language, you are allowing the reader to size up the character without spoon feeding information that might push the reader from the story. The reader wants to feel intelligent as he or she comes to their own conclusions. It’s the writer’s job (you) to be invisible enough to help lay out the signs or clues that get the reader to where you want them to go.

Check out some of these statistics…

55% of communication consists of body language
38% is expressed through voice
7% is communicated through words

Yeah, I was kind of shocked by the only 7% is communicated through words. Kind of made me feel small and unimportant with all my writing, which then made me realize that it’s all in how you express those words. That’s the key ingredient to really great writing. So my next thought was… how do my own characters express themselves?

There are 4 major ways for a character to use body language to express themselves…

  • Facial Expressions
  • Gestures
  • Body Posture
  • Space

What are the eyes of your character saying? Is your character fidgeting from boredom or restlessness? Is your character sitting forward to soak up everything another character is telling them? Or is your character in someone’s face for something that made them angry?

Also consider this… does your character’s actions match their words? Readers will believe body language and tone over what someone says. If a character says they’re open to a new idea, but crosses their arms or turns their body away, what the reader really sees is a character who is closed and rejecting the message, but not willing to admit the truth. This sort of “mixed signal” can be used to add to the character, or story. It can also take away from the character and story, if not done correctly.

When using body language it usually helps to build it up to a series of actions, because some body languages (like smiles, fidgeting, or no eye contact) can mean several different things. Writers should give about 5 clues within a scene to show context of an emotion (through body language) without coming out and saying it. This will help lead the reader to make his own conclusion.

Body language is your character. Make sure that that all body language is important, if it isn’t, cut it out. Also get rid of overly used gestures, or body language like… she sighed or he winked. Find new or better ways for your character to express themselves. Remember that too much of a good thing can tip your hand to make the writer visible to the reader. Great writers disappear as their story comes alive.